Onsite parameter -  Body structure

 

In order to properly structure the body of your website pages, you first need to acknowledge the following analogy:

  • The internet is a LIBRARY, your website is one of this library's books (or magazines)

When you're looking for a book in a library, not one book in particular whose title you know (for our analogy here, a book title would correspond to the domain name of a website), but a book on a given subject - you search through the library's index, using the "keywords" related to the topic you 're gathering information on.   

It is hence important for all the books to have been flagged with the proper keywords concerning their content, an exhaustive enough list in order not to be overseen by any.  Also the structure of the book itself should facilitate the reading and understanding of your book. 

Indeed, if you have on one side a book, thats written at all once, with no chapters, no paragraph, but just one huge piece of text, it may be harder to get a rapid idea what the main topic is. 

On the other hand, if you have organised the book in chapters, each properly named, with paragraphs and some book editing (you know, when the font for a title is bigger than the rest, or when footnotes are in tiny print), you have a much higher chance of your book to be found under the right "category", and to be triggered at search for keywords correspong to its content.

Now that this makes sense to everyone, let's apply it to a website.

As a consequence, the websites should be constructed as books, and the webpages should be treated as the actual pages of the said book.  That means they should be formatted  as a written document, with headings, paragraph etc... quite simple, huh?

Headings

There are 6  different levels of headings (<h1> to <h6>)with different importance. The headings should be used just to emphasise the content of your page. DO NOT PUT ALL YOUR CONTENT INTO AN <hn> tag.

  • <h1> - only one per page (like the main chapter title)
  • <h2> - Up to 4 per page (more or less like a paragraph title)
  • <h3> - Up to 8 per page (for important words in the page, so it's easy to see the main structure of the page AND some key indicators on the content itself)

Start your page with an <h1> tag, it is going to be the editorial title of your page, then you can start to write your page content. Separate it into different paragraphs and implement some sub-titles if needed. Be careful with the order of the heading tags. H1 is for the MAIN title, H2 for sub-titles, H3 for sub-sub-titles etc.

Use <strong> instead of <b> when you want to emphasise a keyword. (<b> just means "bold the word", which is purely cosmetic, while <srtrong> says 'bold the word and flag it as important".)

Below we have an example of how the content of a page should be structured:

<body>

<div><h1>Editorial Title</h1>

<p>

Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... <strong>Important Text of the page</strong>... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page...

</p>

<h2>Editorial subtitle</h2>

<p>

Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page... Text of the page...

</p>

</div>

</body>

 

Page content

The page content itself should neither be too long nor too short. If too long, you are going to dilute the page-important keywords' density and internet users are going to be bored... remember internet users do not read the same way on the web as on printed documents. If the content is too short, your page is not going to be considered relevant.

From my experience, I would say that the page's content should be between 300 and 600 words. 

...And you should convey your main message above the fold  (= the user should not need to scroll to read your main message).

Keyword density

Page keyword density has historically been an important parameter of the relevancy algorithm of search engines.

Five years ago, if you stuffed your page with keywords, you would have had very good odds to get a top position within most of the SERPs.

Nowadays, keyword density still is important but,  in my view,  the best way to get your website on top of SERPs is more a question of semantic conformity between the different steps of a robots crawl. This conformity begins from the inbound link anchor and finishes with the websites your page is giving a link to.

Search Engine Spiders have also gotten smarter, and most of them are able to detect keyword stuffing. Not only will they not be taken into account for the page's relevancy, but it will most likely penalize the whole site, as it would trigger an "index spam" flag from the crawler.

Having said that, we can consider that a good keyword density for a page is between 3% and 8% but you must keep one thing in mind:

"THE WEBSITE CONTENT MUST BE WRITTEN FOR INTERNET USERS, NOT FOR SEARCH ENGINES! DO NOT TRY TO REACH HIGH KEYWORDS DENSITY AT ALL COSTS! CONTENT NEEDS TO MAKE SENSE AND MUST BE ATTRACTIVE TO INTERNET USERS"